‘Break Point,’ by Ollie Ollerton.

This is the third book in the batch recently produced by the DS group of TV’s ‘Who Dares Wins.’

Interestingly, each of the three is quite different in content, though I won’t say too much for fear of dropping some ‘spoilers.

Ollie’s book though, I’d say is a bit more ‘graphic” in detail, describing certain instances in depth. Like Foxy, Ollie is very open about his life and how he ended up where he has. And it’s been a real whirlwind of a journey (God – I hate using that expression!) But it is.

As I’ve said of both Ant and Foxy”s books, this is a riveting read and possibly more than the others, this gives a no holds barred view of life in the Special Forces – and what goes on when the action stops / they are waiting for the action to start.

I’m really glad these guys who served so well and have been through so much, have found another niche in life and, it would seem, contentment.

First Man In.

I read this is about a week,having been given it as a Christmas present.

I have the utmost respect for our Armed forces, and what with the ‘SAS – Who Dares Wins’ TV programme now into its fifth series, I knew more or less what to expect here. But that did not detract from an engrossing and ‘easy’ read.

Autobiographies / biographies are generally interesting I think because there is always something in every book that the reader can relate to. For me, I love the thought of the physical challenges involved in getting to the selection process for the Special Forces. The courage, bravery and mental determination, though absolutely amazes me.

And I didn’t appreciate the difference between the attitudes of those in Para, to those in SBS / SAS. Interesting.

But though Ant’s experiences are all military based, there is so much to take inspiration from and take into one’s own daily life – especially if a ‘leader’ role is called for – be that in a family life situation; sports team or work environment.

Excellent read.

(I’ve already read Jason Fox’s ‘Battle Scars’ book, and that dealt more with the mental side of warfare, though no less riveting. I’ll not be getting hold of Billy and Ollie’s books too.)

Battle Scars. A Story of War and All That Follows.

I’ve been an avid watcher of ‘SAS – Who Dares Wins’ since the very first episode, so I was very interested to read this book.
It was a rather slow start, I’d say, with quite a bit of repetition it seemed. But when I accepted the book focused more on the ‘All That Follows’ part of the title rather than the ”Story of War’ aspect, I became totally engrossed.
What these guys (and now women) do in the Elite Forces is just incredible. What they do for our country is incredible. And how they are / were treated by the military when they suffered mental health issues as a direct result of their service, is / was also incredible. In a ‘not good’ kind of way.

The book is quite an eye-opener, and well done Foxy on putting all this out there. There are lessons to be taken for everyone in this book.